Learn English – “A different one” when we have 3 objects – other/another?

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Possible Duplicate:
Can “another” be used with plural nouns provided periods or measurements don’t count?

Here is the context (found in a forum for learners of English)

WAITRESS: Do you two students want more pie? We have two flavors.

STUDENT A: Yes. I already had one slice of apple pie, and now I would like another one.

STUDENT B: Yes, but I already had a slice of apple, so now I would like to try the other one.

1 "Another one" means "one more of the same."
2 "the other one" means "a different one."

It's pretty much clear with two objects but it's not clear for me if there were three different objects.

WAITRESS: Do you two students want more pie? We have three flavors.

STUDENT A: Yes. I already had one slice of apple pie, and now I would like another one.

STUDENT B: Yes, but I already had a slice of apple, so now I would like to try ….

What does B have to say? If he says:

1) "another" – he gets the same flavor

2) "the other" – is not possible as it implies only one while there are two left.

What shall B say?

PS: There are many questions dealing with other/another but I failed to find one dealing with this very matter, if there is still one out there I am sorry not to have found it.

Best Answer

People would just say

Yes, but I already had a slice of apple, so now I would like to try a different pie.

Well, they wouldn't say that, it's overly verbose. They'd more likely say

Yes, but a different pie.

and then specify the pie.

If you have to use another or other you could try

Yes, and/but I'll try another pie this time.

and then specify the pie.