2 General description of synchronization system

05.103GPPRadio subsystem synchronizationTS

This clause gives a general description of the synchronization system. Detailed requirements are given in clauses 3 to 7.

The BTS sends signals on the BCCH or, for COMPACT on the CPBCCH, to enable the MS to synchronize itself to the BTS and if necessary correct its frequency standard to be in line with that of the BTS. The signals sent by the BTS for these purposes are:

a) Frequency correction bursts;

b) Synchronization bursts.

The timings of timeslots, TDMA frames, TCH frames, control channel frames, and (for COMPACT) the rotation of time groups are all related to a common set of counters which run continuously whether the MS and BTS are transmitting or not. Thus, once the MS has determined the correct setting of these counters, all its processes are synchronized to the current serving BTS.

The MS times its transmissions to the BTS in line with those received from the BTS. The BTS sends to each MS a "timing advance" parameter (TA) according to the perceived round trip propagation delay BTS‑MS‑BTS. The MS advances its timing by this amount, with the result that signals from different MS’s arriving at the BTS and compensated for propagation delay. This process is called "adaptive frame alignment".

Additionally, synchronization functions may be implemented in both the MS and the BTS to support the so‑called pseudo synchronization scheme. The support of this scheme is optional except that MS shall measure and report the Observed Timing Difference (OTD), which is a mandatory requirement. The detailed specifications of the pseudo‑synchronization scheme are included in annex A.

While in dual transfer mode a class A MS performs all the tasks of dedicated mode. In addition, upper layers can require the release of all the packet resources, which triggers the transition to dedicated mode and the release of the RR resources, which triggers the transition to idle mode and packet idle mode.
When handed over to a new cell, the MS leaves the dual transfer mode, enters the dedicated mode where it switches to the new cell, may read the system information messages sent on the SACCH and may then enter dual transfer mode in the new cell (see 03.64 [3]).

In CTS, the CTS-FP sends signals on the CTSBCH to enable the MS to synchronize itself to the CTS-FP and if necessary correct its frequency standard to be in line with that of the CTS-FP.

The signals sent by the CTS-FP for these purposes are:

a) Frequency correction bursts;

b) Synchronization bursts.

The timings of timeslots, TDMA frames, CTSBCH, CTSARCH, CTSAGCH and CTSPCH frames are all related to a first common set of counters which run continuously whether the CTS-MS and CTS-FP are transmitting or not. Thus, once the CTS-MS has determined the correct setting of these first counters, the CTS-MS is able to attach to the current serving CTS-FP. In addition, during CTS-MS attachment, the CTS-FP sends to the CTS-MS the remaining counters for SACCH and TCH frames. Then, all processes of the CTS-MS are synchronized to the current serving CTS-FP.

The CTS-MS times its transmissions to the CTS-FP in line with those received from the CTS-FP. The timing advance parameter is set to zero for CTS.

Additionally, the CTS-FP may be assisted by a CTS-MS to adjust its frequency source. When required by the CTS-FP, the CTS-MS estimates if possible and reports the Observed Frequency Offset of the CTS-FP with a specified BTS. The CTS-FP may then adjust its frequency source according to this value.