4.2 Alarm Call

29.198-04-23GPPOpen Service Access (OSA) Application Programming Interface (API)Part 4: Call controlRelease 9Subpart 2: Generic call control Service Capability Feature (SCF)TS

The following sequence diagram shows a ‘reminder message’, in the form of an alarm, being delivered to a customer as a result of a trigger from an application. Typically, the application would be set to trigger at a certain time, however, the application could also trigger on events.

1: This message is used to create an object implementing the IpAppCall interface.

2: This message requests the object implementing the IpCallControlManager interface to create an object implementing the IpCall interface.

3: Assuming that the criteria for creating an object implementing the IpCall interface (e.g. load control values not exceeded) is met it is created.

4: This message instructs the object implementing the IpCall interface to route the call to the customer destined to receive the ‘reminder message’

5: This message passes the result of the call being answered to its callback object.

6: This message is used to forward the previous message to the IpAppLogic.

7: The application requests a new UICall object that is associated with the call object.

8: Assuming all criteria are met, a new UICall object is created by the service.

9: This message instructs the object implementing the IpUICall interface to send the alarm to the customer’s call.

10: When the announcement ends this is reported to the call back interface.

11: The event is forwarded to the application logic.

12: The application releases the UICall object, since no further announcements are required. Alternatively, the application could have indicated P_FINAL_REQUEST in the sendInfoReq in which case the UICall object would have been implicitly released after the announcement was played.

13: The application releases the call and all associated parties.